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CSMS Magazine Staff Writers

Two years after the earthquake that left about a third of Haiti’s population crippled, there is very little to show for. Port-au-Prince still remains a defunct city, where more than half of its inhabitants live in a hellish world surrounded by toxic pile and tents. As always, the Haitian government, made up reactionary panhandlers, is waiting for its next opportunity to fill its own personal lots off the never-ending misery of the deprived masses.

U.N. Special Envoy and Haiti’s proconsul, former U.S. President Bill Clinton, arrived in Haiti on Wednesday and will participate in some of the memorial services. On Wednesday, he toured two businesses in northern Haiti to highlight the country’s investment opportunities.

It has been reported that the Canadian government has offered $ 20 million dollars to help relocate some 20,000 people from tent encampments only blocks from the still crumpled presidential palace. According to Reuters News Agency, Canada said it was contributing $20 million to the relocation effort.

Despite billions of dollars of international donations and aid pledges, many Haitians say they have yet to see the slightest results of the recovery and reconstruction effort. According to our correspondent on the ground in Port-au-Prince, Yves Duchet, just over half of the piles of concrete, steel and other debris littering the capital of Port-au-Prince and its surrounding areas have been cleared.

Life is virtual hell on earth in Haiti, where millions of Haitians are complaining about a lack of housing and jobs two years after the quake.

The Sweet Micky government claims “it is working and moving ahead,” pointing out to post-quake projects like a $257 million industrial park being built on Haiti’s northwest coast and a program to stimulate agriculture production as evidence some progress is being made.

However, the reality on the ground portrays some very different pictures. So, one wonders when will the San Salvador come to the rescue of this malnourished, mistreated and utterly neglected nation?

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